Teslik & Sip Root Gorean Medicine

Gorean Roleplay for the Caste of Physicians

2. POISONS AND ANTIDOTES


Many Gorean poisons in the books are quite deadly and little is said in the novels about antidotes or preventative measures. In cases where antidotes are mentioned, little is said about the composition of the antidote. In some cases no antidote exists, for example, for ost venom.

2.1. MEANS OF POISONING


FANG RING


On the first finger of his left hand he wore a fang ring, which, I had little doubt, would contain a poison, probably that of the deadly kanda plant.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Explorers of Gor (Gorean Saga 13) (Kindle Locations 2963-2964). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]

I looked to the couch of Shaba. About it lay dead Kurii and slaughtered askaris. Shaba, coughing, held his chest. The poison ring, the fang ring, had been emptied. Msaliti had awaited his opportunity.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Explorers of Gor (Gorean Saga 13) (Kindle Locations 9311-9312). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


POISONED ARROW


“The bolts,” said the man, indicating the missiles at rest in the guides of the weapons, “are tipped with kanda. The slightest scratch from them will finish you.”

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Beasts of Gor (Gorean Saga 12) (Kindle Locations 3128-3129). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


POISONED BLADE (POISONED STEEL)


She was a captive female, and must, naturally, submit to her assessment as prize; she must also be, incidentally, examined for weapons; a dagger or poisoned needle is often concealed in the clothing of free women.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Nomads of Gor (Gorean Saga 4) (Kindle Locations 658-659). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


The Older Tarl, taking the knife by the hand guard, withdrew it. It was a throwing knife, of a sort used in Ar, much smaller than the southern quiva, and tapered on only one side. It was a knife designed for killing. Mixed with the blood and fluids of the body there was a smear of white at the end of the steel, the softened residue of a glaze of kanda paste, now melted by body heat, which had coated the tip of the blade. On the hilt of the dagger, curling about it, was the legend “I have sought him. I have found him.” It was a killing knife.

“The Caste of Assassins?” I had asked.

“Unlikely,” had said the Older Tarl, “for Assassins are commonly too proud for poison.”

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Assassin of Gor (Gorean Saga 5) (Kindle Locations 670-675). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


“Poison, I think,” said he, “perhaps a subtle toxin, coated on a blade, thus entered into a wound.”

“Such is contrary to the codes,” I said.

“Poisoned steel,” he said.

I said nothing.

“Sullius Maximus,” he said, “is in Tyros.”

“I would not have thought Sarus of Tyros would have used poisoned steel,” I said. Such a device, like the poisoned arrow, was not only against the codes of the warriors, but, generally, was regarded as unworthy of men. Poison was regarded as a woman’s weapon.

Iskander shrugged.

“Sullius Maximus,” he said, “invented such a drug. He tested it, by pin pricks, on the limbs of a captured enemy, paralyzing him from the neck down. He kept him seated at his right side, as a guest in regal robes, for more than a week. When he tired of the sport he had him killed.”

“Is there an antidote?” I asked.

“No,” said Iskander.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Marauders of Gor (Gorean Saga 9) (Kindle Locations 406-415). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.


“The poison,” said he, “that which lay upon the blades of the men of Sarus of Tyros, lurks yet in your body.”

“There is no antidote,” I told him. “This I had from Iskander of Turia, who knew the toxin.”

“Warrior,” said the man who stood with Samos, “I bring the antidote.”

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Marauders of Gor (Gorean Saga 9) (Kindle Locations 5272-5275). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


“I see you are not of the assassins,” I said. It is a matter of pride for members of that caste to avoid the use of poisoned steel. Too, their codes forbid it.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Beasts of Gor (Gorean Saga 12) (Kindle Locations 3129-3130). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


In moments he had retrieved the tiny dagger which lay there, in its small compartment, concealed behind a tile. He cleaned the poison from the side of the dagger, dried it with a towel, as he had the needle, and then threw it to the side of the room, where lay her robe, which he had earlier discarded.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Slave Girl of Gor (Gorean Saga 11) (Kindle Locations 7953-7955). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


“There is perhaps poison on your blade?” I said.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Beasts of Gor (Gorean Saga 12) (Kindle Locations 8157-8158). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


Too, I recalled she had been contemptuous of me, and haughty and cruel to me, in Port Kar, scorning even the memory of my love, when I had been paralyzed, helpless to move from a chair, the victim of the poison of Sullius Maximus, once one of the five Ubars of Port Kar, before the Sovereignty of the Council of Captains. I wondered if she thought that I was still in Port Kar, perhaps huddled before a fire in that same chair, an invalid, its prisoner. But I had recovered, fully, receiving even the antidote for the poison in Torvaldsland.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Renegades of Gor (Gorean Saga 23) (Kindle Locations 2658-2662). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


“I could not then rise from my chair,” I said. “I had been cut in the north by the blade of a sword, treated with a poison from the laboratory of Sullius Maximus, once one of the five Ubars of Port Kar.”

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Magicians of Gor (Gorean Saga 25) (Kindle Locations 11843-11845). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


“I do not think it would be so amusing to you,” I said, “if it were you in whom the poison had worked, paralyzing you, making it impossible for you to rise from the chair.”

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Magicians of Gor (Gorean Saga 25) (Kindle Locations 11856-11857). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]

“Sullius Maximus,” I said.

“Officer to Chenbar, of Kasra, Ubar of Tyros,” he said.

“Traitor to Port Kar,” I said.  “Mixer of poisons.”

He bowed, humbly.

“You recall,” he said, smiling.

“But you brewed an antidote,” I remarked.

“Not of my own free will,” he smiled.

He had been infected with his own toxin, which produced, in time, a broad paralysis, that he might prepare, if time permitted, its remedy.  His lord, Chenbar, had not approved of poisoned steel, and I had once spared the Ubar’s life, on the 25th of Se-Kara.  The antidote, proven in the case of Sullius Maximus, had been conveyed to Port Kar.

[Norman, John (2010-11-29). Swordsmen of Gor (Gorean Saga) (Kindle Locations 1886-1894). E-Reads. Kindle Edition.]

Earlier he had been crippled in the northern forest, the victim of poisoned steel.

[Norman, John (2011-10-05). Mariners of Gor (Kindle Locations 226-227). E-Reads. Kindle Edition.]


POISONED FOOD OR BEVERAGES


She poured wine into the crater and replaced the bottle. Kamchak had watched her hands very carefully. She had had to break the seal on the bottle to open it. The crater had been upside down when she had picked it up. If she had poisoned the wine she had certainly done so deftly.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Nomads of Gor (Gorean Saga 4) (Kindle Locations 2813-2815). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]

“In time,” said the small man, “you will receive a packet of poison.”

I nodded, numbly. Rask of Treve must not die! He must not die! “You will be placed in the house of Bosk, a merchant of Port Kar,” he said.

“You will be placed in the kitchen of that house, and you will be used to serve his table.”

“I can’t,” I wept. “I cannot kill!”

“Then Rask of Treve dies,” said the small man. Haakon of Skjern laughed.

The small man held up a tiny packet. “This,” he said, “is the poison, a powder prepared from the venom of the ost.”

I shuddered. Death by ost venom is among the most hideous of deaths.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Captive of Gor (Gorean Saga 7) (Kindle Locations 6891-6897). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


I took the packet of poison from my rep-cloth kitchen tunic, and dissolved it in the wine. I had been told there was enough there to bring a hundred men to an excruciating death. I swirled the wine, and discarded the packet.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Captive of Gor (Gorean Saga 7) (Kindle Locations 6924-6926). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]

She became frightened of food and drink, lest, perhaps, it might be drugged, or poisoned. 

[Norman, John (2010-11-29). Swordsmen of Gor (Gorean Saga) (Kindle Locations 5591-5592). E-Reads. Kindle Edition.]


POISON GAS


He might have been denied the liquid food dispensed now and then through the tube, a poisonous gas might have been introduced into the container, rather than the sedating gas, the air might have been simply drawn from the container, and so on.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Kur of Gor (Gorean Saga 28) (Kindle Locations 906-907). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


POISON LOCK


Much more dangerous is the poison lock, because the opening through which the tiny pins, usually coated with a paste formed from kanda root, can emerge can be extremely small, almost invisible to the eye, easy to overlook in the crevices and grillwork of the commonly heavy, ornate Gorean lock.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Assassin of Gor (Gorean Saga 5) (Kindle Locations 825-827). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


POISON PELLET


Presumably, it would be at least a matter of minutes before her identity was discovered, and, before that, she would take the poison provided by the Council.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Tarnsman of Gor (Gorean Saga 1) (Kindle Locations 900-901). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition]

Sana had insisted that I keep the pellet of poison which the Council had given her to spare her from the otherwise inevitable tortures that would follow the disclosure of her identity in the cylinders of Ar.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Tarnsman of Gor (Gorean Saga 1) (Kindle Locations 955-957). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


POISONED PINS AND NEEDLES


She was a captive female, and must, naturally, submit to her assessment as prize; she must also be, incidentally, examined for weapons; a dagger or poisoned needle is often concealed in the clothing of free women.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Nomads of Gor (Gorean Saga 4) (Kindle Locations 658-659). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


She sobbed in anger when the tiny, cloth-enfolded needle, tipped with kanda, fell from her hair, caught, and drawn out, by the teeth of the comb of kailiauk tusk.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Beasts of Gor (Gorean Saga 12) (Kindle Locations 9148-9149). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


Much more dangerous is the poison lock, because the opening through which the tiny pins, usually coated with a paste formed from kanda root, can emerge can be extremely small, almost invisible to the eye, easy to overlook in the crevices and grillwork of the commonly heavy, ornate Gorean lock.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Assassin of Gor (Gorean Saga 5) (Kindle Locations 825-827). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


I examined the paws of the kaiila. I found that for which I searched inserted in the right forepaw of the animal. I removed from its paw the tiny, rounded ball of wax, held in place by threads; within the wax, which would soon, in the riding and pounding, and by the heat of the animal’s body, disintegrate, concealed, I found a needle; I smelled it; it was smeared with kanda, a deadly toxin, prepared from the ground roots of the kanda bush; I wiped the needle, with a ripping from my shirt sleeve, cleaning it, and discarded needle and cloth in a refuse pile.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Tribesmen of Gor (Gorean Saga 10) (Kindle Locations 2800-2803). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


He went to the robe on the couch, but, instead of handing it to her, he examined it, lifting it to the light. In one sleeve, in a tiny, narrow sheath, he found a needle, which he held up. Then he approached the bath. She shrank back, frightened. He washed the needle, dried it on a towel and replaced it in the sheath. I had not known the sheath and needle were there, so cunningly had they been concealed in the weaving.

He looked at her.

I had little doubt the needle had been poisoned, probably with Kanda.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Slave Girl of Gor (Gorean Saga 11) (Kindle Locations 7939-7943). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


It is not wise to try to tear away the garments of a free woman with one’s bare hands. They may contain poisoned needles.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Beasts of Gor (Gorean Saga 12) (Kindle Locations 9112-9113). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


A free woman, captured, whose hair her captor unbinds, usually the first time by the stroke of a knife, a precaution against poison pins and other devices, knows full well by this act that she will soon be made his slave.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Explorers of Gor (Gorean Saga 13) (Kindle Locations 4125-4126). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


“Doubtless such toxins still exist,” I mused, “and might be procured. Perhaps one could be entered into your fair body, with so small a wound as a pin prick.”

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Magicians of Gor (Gorean Saga 25) (Kindle Locations 11858-11859). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


POISON SLAVE


For example it is possible to breed a girl whose saliva will be poisonous; such a woman, placed in the Pleasure Gardens of an enemy, can be more dangerous than the knife of an Assassin.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Assassin of Gor (Gorean Saga 5) (Kindle Locations 1782-1783). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


Shortly thereafter Maximus Hegesius Quintilius was found dead, poisoned by the bite of a girl in his Pleasure Gardens, who, before she could be brought before the Scribes of the Law, was strangled by enraged Taurentians, to whom she had been turned over;

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Assassin of Gor (Gorean Saga 5) (Kindle Locations 3602-3604). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


POISON TEETH

...he also had two teeth of gold, which were visible when he laughed, the upper canine teeth, probably containing poison;...

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Nomads of Gor (Gorean Saga 4) (Kindle Locations 1533-1534). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]

“They are poison teeth,” remarked Harold, “a Turian affectation—but quite deadly, being filled with the venom of the ost.”

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Nomads of Gor (Gorean Saga 4) (Kindle Locations 3481-3482). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


The eyes were bulging perhaps a quarter of an inch from the little round head and the mouth, with its two golden teeth, now emptied of ost venom, seemed to be screaming but there was no sound.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Nomads of Gor (Gorean Saga 4) (Kindle Locations 6043-6044). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


POISONED WATER SUPPLIES


On the twentieth day of the siege there was great rejoicing in the camp of Pa-Kur, because in one place the wires had been cut and a squad of spearmen had reached the main siege reservoir, emptying their barrels of toxic kanda, a lethal poison extracted from one of Gor’s desert shrubs. The city would now have to depend primarily on its private wells and the hope of rain. It seemed probable that food and water would soon be scarce in the city and that the Initiates, whose resistance had been unimaginative and who were apparently unable to protect the city, would be forced to face a hungry and desperate population.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Tarnsman of Gor (Gorean Saga 1) (Kindle Locations 2492-2497). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.


I asked him about this, for Tuchuk warfare, as I understood it, was complete, leaving no living thing in its wake, killing even domestic animals and poisoning wells.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Nomads of Gor (Gorean Saga 4) (Kindle Locations 4955-4956). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


Wells were poisoned and fields burned and salted to prevent the approach of armies from the north.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Slave Girl of Gor (Gorean Saga 11) (Kindle Locations 2640-2641). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]

2.2. FLORA


FLOWERS OF THE VINE SEA


“I see no large ships here,” said Cabot. “A large ship, with many in the crew, could work the vines, even over days, or weeks, cutting a path. Too, a large ship, with the force of the wind in her sails, might tear herself loose.”

“I find that hard to believe,” I said.

“A fresh wind,” he said, “might clear the air.” I noted, again, the perfume of the garden, so sweet, pervasive, and heavy. I wondered if it did not have its role to play in this strange place. I could see two other derelicts from where I stood, smothered in flowers. “The flowers are beautiful,” I said.

“And perhaps deadly,” said Cabot.

“A slow poison?” I said.

“Let us hope not,” he said.

Two men had thrown themselves from the bulwarks of the great ship, screaming, into the vines below.

Men had looted one another’s sea chests openly, and then died in the corridors and companionways.

Two warriors of the Pani, which groups had not participated in the looting, had slain one another, which, given the custom of their discipline, was unthinkable.

“We cannot wait here indefinitely,” said Cabot.

“We must try to break free?” I said.

“Why has it not been attempted?” asked Cabot. “The looting, the danger?” I said.

“The looting was done, days ago,” said Cabot, “at least of the ships conveniently accessible.”

“The flowers?” I said.

“I think so,” said Cabot.

“They are beautiful,” I said.

“Yes,” said Cabot. “They are beautiful.” He then went to the rail, and lowered himself to the waiting ship’s boat, and I followed him.

[Norman, John (2011-10-05). Mariners of Gor (Kindle Locations 4124-4141). E-Reads. Kindle Edition.]


KANDA


A plant which grows in desert regions of Gor. The roots of the kanda plant are a deadly poison when groun but the leaves have narcotic properties and can be rolled and formed into strings and chewed or sucked, but the juice is never swallowed.

Much more dangerous is the poison lock, because the opening through which the tiny pins, usually coated with a paste formed from kanda root, can emerge can be extremely small, almost invisible to the eye, easy to overlook in the crevices and grillwork of the commonly heavy, ornate Gorean lock.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Assassin of Gor (Gorean Saga 5) (Kindle Locations 825-827). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


“The bolts,” said the man, indicating the missiles at rest in the guides of the weapons, “are tipped with kanda. The slightest scratch from them will finish you.”

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Beasts of Gor (Gorean Saga 12) (Kindle Locations 3128-3129). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


She sobbed in anger when the tiny, cloth-enfolded needle, tipped with kanda, fell from her hair, caught, and drawn out, by the teeth of the comb of kailiauk tusk.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Beasts of Gor (Gorean Saga 12) (Kindle Locations 9148-9149). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]

On the first finger of his left hand he wore a fang ring, which, I had little doubt, would contain a poison, probably that of the deadly kanda plant.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Explorers of Gor (Gorean Saga 13) (Kindle Locations 2963-2964). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


“It was not your intention then that I be killed?” I asked.

“Certainly not,” said Shaba. “If that was all that was desired, kanda might have been introduced into your drink as easily as sajel and gieron.”

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Explorers of Gor (Gorean Saga 13) (Kindle Locations 3036-3038). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


“You are a shrewd man,” said Shaba. He lifted his left hand, on the first finger of which was a fang ring. He folded his left hand into a fist and, with his thumb, pressed a tiny switch on the ring. The fang, of hollow steel, springing up, was then exposed.

“It contains kanda?” I asked.

“Yes,” said he.

“It will do you little good,” I said, “if you cannot strike me with it.”

“A scratch will be sufficient,” he said.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Explorers of Gor (Gorean Saga 13) (Kindle Locations 3363-3367). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


Shaba touched the ring. On his right hand, now, he wore another ring, the fang ring, which, filled with kanda, I had seen earlier in Schendi. A scratch from that ring would destroy a kailiauk in a matter of seconds.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Explorers of Gor (Gorean Saga 13) (Kindle Locations 9087-9088). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


Beside him, coiled, perhaps as a symbol of power, lay a bosk whip. Kutaituchik absently reached into a small golden box near his right knee and drew out a string of rolled kanda leaf.

The roots of the kanda plant, which grows largely in desert regions on Gor, are extremely toxic, but, surprisingly, the rolled leaves of this plant, which are relatively innocuous, are formed into strings and, chewed or sucked, are much favored by many Goreans, particularly in the southern hemisphere, where the leaf is more abundant.

Kutaituchik, not taking his eyes off us, thrust one end of the green kanda string in the left side of his mouth and, very slowly, began to chew it. He said nothing, nor did Kamchak. We simply sat near him, cross-legged. I was conscious that only we three on that dais were sitting. I was pleased that there were no prostrations or grovelings involved in approaching the august presence of the exalted Kutaituchik. I gathered that once, in his earlier years, he might have been a rider of the kaiila, that he might have been skilled with the bow and lance, and the quiva; such a man would not need ceremony; I sensed that once this man might have ridden six hundred pasangs in a day, living on a mouthful of water and a handful of bosk meat kept soft and warm between his saddle and the back of the kaiila; that there might have been few as swift with the quiva, as delicate with the lance, as he; that he had known the wars and the winters of the prairie; that he had met animals and men, as enemies, and had lived; such a man did not need ceremony; such a man, I sensed, was Kutaituchik, called Ubar of the Tuchuks.

And yet was I sad as I looked upon him, for I sensed that for this man there could no longer be the saddle of the kaiila, the whirling of the rope and bola, the hunt and the war. Now, from the right side of his mouth, thin, black and wet, there emerged the chewed string of kanda, a quarter of an inch at a time, slowly. The drooping eyes, glazed, regarded us. For him there could no longer be the swift races across the frozen prairie; the meetings in arms; even the dancing to the sky about a fire of bosk dung.

Kamchak and I waited until the string had been chewed.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Nomads of Gor (Gorean Saga 4) (Kindle Locations 765-781). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


Tobacco is unknown on Gor, though there are certain habits or vices to take its place, in particular the stimulation afforded by chewing on the leaves of the Kanda plant, the roots of which, oddly enough, when ground and dried, constitute an extremely deadly poison.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Priest-Kings of Gor (Gorean Saga 3) (Kindle Locations 337-339). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


He went to the robe on the couch, but, instead of handing it to her, he examined it, lifting it to the light. In one sleeve, in a tiny, narrow sheath, he found a needle, which he held up. Then he approached the bath. She shrank back, frightened. He washed the needle, dried it on a towel and replaced it in the sheath.

I had not known the sheath and needle were there, so cunningly had they been concealed in the weaving. He looked at her.

I had little doubt the needle had been poisoned, probably with Kanda.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Slave Girl of Gor (Gorean Saga 11) (Kindle Locations 7939-7943). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]

On the twentieth day of the siege there was great rejoicing in the camp of Pa-Kur, because in one place the wires had been cut and a squad of spearmen had reached the main siege reservoir, emptying their barrels of toxic kanda, a lethal poison extracted from one of Gor’s desert shrubs.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Tarnsman of Gor (Gorean Saga 1) (Kindle Locations 2492-2494). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


I examined the paws of the kaiila. I found that for which I searched inserted in the right forepaw of the animal. I removed from its paw the tiny, rounded ball of wax, held in place by threads; within the wax, which would soon, in the riding and pounding, and by the heat of the animal’s body, disintegrate, concealed, I found a needle; I smelled it; it was smeared with kanda, a deadly toxin, prepared from the ground roots of the kanda bush; I wiped the needle, with a ripping from my shirt sleeve, cleaning it, and discarded needle and cloth in a refuse pile.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Tribesmen of Gor (Gorean Saga 10) (Kindle Locations 2800-2803). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


MOLD


Perhaps, even, the container might have been slowly filled with mud or sand, or with fast-growing poisonous molds, or with dark water, in which swam the tiny, razor-teethed eels kept in large pools at the palatial villas of some Gorean oligarchs, both as a delicacy, and as a standing admonition to slaves, to which swift, snakelike, voracious creatures they may be thrown.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Kur of Gor (Gorean Saga 28) (Kindle Locations 910-913). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


SEAWEED


Many fish in these tropical waters are poisonous to eat, a function of certain forms of seaweed on which they feed. The seaweed is harmless to the fish but it contains substances toxic to humans.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Explorers of Gor (Gorean Saga 13) (Kindle Locations 2123-2124). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]

2.3. MAN-MADE


POISON OF SULLIUS MAXIMUS OF TYROS


Sullius was a highly skilled poisoner who believed in testing the poisons against his prisoners. His poison causes numbing and paralysis. There is an antidote for it; he was forced to develop it in response to being poisoned with his own poison. The poison starts to take affect within a few days of the poisoning. The victim will start to grow numb and will eventually fall unconscious. While unconscious, he or she will experience high fever, along with chills and sweats; also he or she will experience delusions.

I gazed upon the Ubars: squat, brilliant Chung; narrow-faced, cunning Eteocles; tall, long-haired Nigel, like a warlord from Torvaldsland; and Sullius Maximus, who was said to write poetry and be a student of the properties of various poisons.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Raiders of Gor (Gorean Saga 6) (Kindle Locations 2860-2862). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


Sullius Maximus, who himself dabbled in poetry, and poisons, was a man of high culture, and his opinions in such matters were greatly respected.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Raiders of Gor (Gorean Saga 6) (Kindle Locations 4158-4159). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


“Sullius Maximus,” he said, “invented such a drug. He tested it, by pin pricks, on the limbs of a captured enemy, paralyzing him from the neck down. He kept him seated at his right side, as a guest in regal robes, for more than a week. When he tired of the sport he had him killed.”

“Is there an antidote?” I asked.

“No,” said Iskander.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Marauders of Gor (Gorean Saga 9) (Kindle Location 412-415). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


SYMPTOMS OF THE POISON OF SULLIUS MAXIMUS OF TYROS


“Take me to the Tesephone, Thurnock,” I said. “I am tired. I am tired.”

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Hunters of Gor (Gorean Saga 8) (Kindle Location 5926). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


I was wet from the salt water, thrusting the longboat into Thassa. My side and my left arm stung with the salt, and felt stiff with the cold, and then, too, suddenly, I felt a warmth, slow and spreading. It seemed welcome. I did not much care. But I knew that it was my own blood.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Hunters of Gor (Gorean Saga 8) (Kindle Locations 5948-5950). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


I had recollected my honor. I laughed bitterly. Little good had it done me. Marlenus’ was the victory, not mine. I had only grievous wounds, and cold.

My left leg, too, began to feel stiff. I could not move it.

I looked down into Thassa. The glittering surface of the water, broken by the stroke of the oars, seemed to swirl. I had nothing.

“Captain?” asked Thurnock.

I slumped over the tiller.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Hunters of Gor (Gorean Saga 8) (Kindle Locations 5955-5959). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


I could not move the left side of my body.

I watched Marlenus and his men, and the slaves, and captives, make their way toward me.

It was four days since the night of the stockade.

I had lain, in pain and fever, in my cabin, in the small stern castle of the Tesephone.

It had seemed that Sheera had cared for me, and that, in fitful wakings, I had seen her face, intent above mine, and felt her hand, and a warmth, and sponging, at my side.

And I had cried out, and tried to rise, but strong hands, those of Rim and Arn, had pressed me back, holding me.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Hunters of Gor (Gorean Saga 8) (Kindle Locations 5976-5981). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]

I sat in the captain’s chair, in authority, but crippled, huddled in blankets, bitter. I knew that I was an important man, but I could not move the left side of my body.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Hunters of Gor (Gorean Saga 8) (Kindle Locations 6101-6102). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]

I opened my eyes and the cabin, blurred, took shape. What had seemed a dim sun, a flame in darkness, became a ship’s lantern, swinging on its iron ring.

“Vella?” I asked.

“The fever is broken,” said Sheera, her hand on my forehead.

I felt the furs drawn about me. There were tears in Sheera’s eyes. I had thought she had escaped. My collar still encircled her throat. She wore a tunic of white wool, clean.

“Rest, sweet Bosk of Port Kar,” said she.

“Rest, Captain,” whispered Thurnock.

I closed my eyes, and fell asleep.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Hunters of Gor (Gorean Saga 8) (Kindle Locations 6030-6036). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


It was cold in the blankets. I could not move my left hand or arm, or leg.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Hunters of Gor (Gorean Saga 8) (Kindle Locations 6065-6066). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


ANTIDOTE TO THE POISON OF SULLIUS MAXIMUS OF TYROS


“The poison,” said he, “that which lay upon the blades of the men of Sarus of Tyros, lurks yet in your body.”

“There is no antidote,” I told him. “This I had from Iskander of Turia, who knew the toxin.”

“Warrior,” said the man who stood with Samos, “I bring the antidote.”

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Marauders of Gor (Gorean Saga 9) (Kindle Locations 5272-5275). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]

You were magnanimous, honoring us as warriors and sword brothers. I demanded an antidote. Laughing, Sullius Maximus, adjusting his cloak, informed me that there was none.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Marauders of Gor (Gorean Saga 9) (Kindle Locations 5298-5299). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


“Within seconds,” said Sarus, “the spiteful fluid took its effect. The eyes of Sullius were wild with fear. ‘The antidote! The antidote!’ he begged. We sat him in a curule chair, vested as a Ubar, and left him. We wished the poison to work, to be truly fixed within his system. The next day, when the bar of noon was struck on the wharves, we administered to him the antidote. It was effective.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Marauders of Gor (Gorean Saga 9) (Kindle Locations 5311-5314). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]

“There is, I discover, attendant upon its assimilation,” said Sarus of Tyros, “delirium and fever, but, in the end, the body finds itself freed of both poison and antidote.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Marauders of Gor (Gorean Saga 9) (Kindle Locations 5319-5320). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


For more than a day I had lain in fever, in delirium, while in my body had been fought the battle of poison and antidote. I had sweated, and cried out, and raged, but, in the end, I had thrown the furs from me.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Marauders of Gor (Gorean Saga 9) (Kindle Locations 5394-5396). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


But when, long later, after I had learned the lessons of Torvaldsland, I ridded myself of the poison in the cleansing delirium of the antidote, I had not cried out, in weakness, for her love, begging it, but rather, in strength, laughing, had collared her, putting her to my feet and making her my slave.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Tribesmen of Gor (Gorean Saga 10) (Kindle Locations 2160-2162). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


“He called you ‘Bosk of Port Kar,’” said Ivar Forkbeard, standing near me.

I smiled. “It is a name I am sometimes known by,” I said.

Sarus proffered to me the vial.

I took it. “There is, I discover, attendant upon its assimilation,” said Sarus of Tyros, “delirium and fever, but, in the end, the body finds itself freed of both poison and antidote. I give it to you, Bosk of Port Kar, and with it the apologies of my Ubar, Chenbar, and those of myself, a seaman in his service.”

“I am surprised,” I said, “that Chenbar, the Sea Sleen, is so solicitous of my welfare.”

Sarus laughed. “He is not solicitous of your welfare, Warrior. He is solicitous, rather, of the honor of Tyros. Little would please Chenbar more than to meet you with daggers on the fighting circle of Tyros. He owes you much, a defeat, and chains and a dungeon, and he has a long memory, my Ubar. No, he is not solicitous of your welfare. If anything, he wants you well and strong, that he may meet you, evenly, with cold steel.”

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Marauders of Gor (Gorean Saga 9) (Kindle Locations 5317-5325). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


Then he said, “Drink, Bosk of Port Kar, and restore the honor of Chenbar, and the honor of Sarus, and of Tyros.”

I removed the stopper from the vial.

“It may itself be poison,” said Samos. I smelled it. It smelled sweet, not unlike a syrup of Turia. “Yes,” I said, “it may be.” It was true what Samos had said. It could be, indeed, that I held in my hand not an antidote, but a lethal dose of some unknown toxin. I thought of Turia, of its baths and wines. The plan of Tyros might thus, foiled upon the coast of Thassa, be in effect accomplished in the hall of Svein Blue Tooth, at least with respect to he known as Bosk of Port Kar.

“Do not drink it,” said the Forkbeard to me.

But I had felt, after the battle, again in my body the effects of the poison, though briefly. I had little doubt but what it still lingered in my body. I had little doubt but what, in time, it would again force me to the blankets and chair of a recluse in a hall in Port Kar. If not countered, it would, eventually, doubtless, have its way.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Marauders of Gor (Gorean Saga 9) (Kindle Locations 5331-5339). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


Too, I recalled she had been contemptuous of me, and haughty and cruel to me, in Port Kar, scorning even the memory of my love, when I had been paralyzed, helpless to move from a chair, the victim of the poison of Sullius Maximus, once one of the five Ubars of Port Kar, before the Sovereignty of the Council of Captains. I wondered if she thought that I was still in Port Kar, perhaps huddled before a fire in that same chair, an invalid, its prisoner. But I had recovered, fully, receiving even the antidote for the poison in Torvaldsland.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Renegades of Gor (Gorean Saga 23) (Kindle Locations 2658-2662). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


“Sullius Maximus,” I said.

“Officer to Chenbar, of Kasra, Ubar of Tyros,” he said.

“Traitor to Port Kar,” I said.  “Mixer of poisons.”

He bowed, humbly.

“You recall,” he said, smiling.

“But you brewed an antidote,” I remarked.

“Not of my own free will,” he smiled.

He had been infected with his own toxin, which produced, in time, a broad paralysis, that he might prepare, if time permitted, its remedy.  His lord, Chenbar, had not approved of poisoned steel, and I had once spared the Ubar’s life, on the 25th of Se-Kara.  The antidote, proven in the case of Sullius Maximus, had been conveyed to Port Kar.

[Norman, John (2010-11-29). Swordsmen of Gor (Gorean Saga) (Kindle Locations 1886-1894). E-Reads. Kindle Edition.]


POISON GAS (UNSPECIFIED AGENT)


He might have been denied the liquid food dispensed now and then through the tube, a poisonous gas might have been introduced into the container, rather than the sedating gas, the air might have been simply drawn from the container, and so on.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Kur of Gor (Gorean Saga 28) (Kindle Locations 906-907). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


POISON PELLET (UNSPECIFIED AGENT)


Presumably, it would be at least a matter of minutes before her identity was discovered, and, before that, she would take the poison provided by the Council.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Tarnsman of Gor (Gorean Saga 1) (Kindle Locations 900-901). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition]


Sana had insisted that I keep the pellet of poison which the Council had given her to spare her from the otherwise inevitable tortures that would follow the disclosure of her identity in the cylinders of Ar.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Tarnsman of Gor (Gorean Saga 1) (Kindle Locations 955-957). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


POISON POWDER (UNSPECIFIED AGENT)


“In time,” said the small man, “you will receive a packet of poison.”

I nodded, numbly. Rask of Treve must not die! He must not die! “You will be placed in the house of Bosk, a merchant of Port Kar,” he said.

“You will be placed in the kitchen of that house, and you will be used to serve his table.”

“I can’t,” I wept. “I cannot kill!”

“Then Rask of Treve dies,” said the small man. Haakon of Skjern laughed.

The small man held up a tiny packet. “This,” he said, “is the poison, a powder prepared from the venom of the ost.”

I shuddered. Death by ost venom is among the most hideous of deaths.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Captive of Gor (Gorean Saga 7) (Kindle Locations 6891-6897). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


I took the packet of poison from my rep-cloth kitchen tunic, and dissolved it in the wine. I had been told there was enough there to bring a hundred men to an excruciating death. I swirled the wine, and discarded the packet.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Captive of Gor (Gorean Saga 7) (Kindle Locations 6924-6926). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]



2.4. FAUNA


COSIAN WINGFISH


This fish is a tiny, delicate fish, blue, about the size of a tarn disk when curled in one’s hand; it has three or four slender spines in its dorsal fin, which are poisonous; it is capable of hurling itself from the water and, for brief distances, on its stiff pectoral fins, gliding through the air, usually to evade the smaller sea-tharlarions, which seem to be immune to the poison of the spines.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Nomads of Gor (Gorean Saga 4) (Kindle Locations 1522-1525). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


Near her, one night, lying off her shore, silently, I heard the mating whistles of the tiny, lovely Cosian wingfish. This is a small, delicate fish; it has three or four slender spines in its dorsal fin, which are poisonous. It is called the wingfish because it can, on its stiff pectoral fins, for short distances, glide through the air, usually in an attempt to flee small sea tharlarion, who are immune to the poison of the spines.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Raiders of Gor (Gorean Saga 6) (Kindle Locations 2558-2561). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


GOLDEN BEETLE


The Golden Beetle is specific to the Nest of the Priest Kings

I found nothing that could have caused her death unless perhaps a small puncture on her left side, through which some poison might have been injected.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Priest-Kings of Gor (Gorean Saga 3) (Kindle Locations 2728-2729). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


These swellings, hard, round and smooth, seemed to lie just beneath the skin and to be roughly the size of one’s fist. I supposed they might have been some unusual physiological reaction to the poison which I conjectured had been injected into her system through the small, livid puncture, also on her left side.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Priest-Kings of Gor (Gorean Saga 3) (Kindle Locations 2731-2733). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


Her body was stiff yet from the venom which had induced the paralysis, but now, perhaps because of the removal of the five eggs, it seemed somewhat warmer and more yielding than before.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Priest-Kings of Gor (Gorean Saga 3) (Kindle Locations 2795-2796). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


But now it was important to get her from the tunnels, to find her a place of refuge and safety where I hoped she might recover from the venom of the Golden Beetle.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Priest-Kings of Gor (Gorean Saga 3) (Kindle Locations 2854-2855). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


NEEDLE FLY


Most sting flies, or needle flies, as the men from the south call them, originate in the delta, and similar places, estuaries and such, as their eggs are laid on the stems of rence plants. As a result of the regularity of breeding and incubation times there tends, also, to be peak times for hatching. These peak times are also in part, it is thought, a function of a combination of natural factors, having to do with conditions in the delta, such as temperature and humidity, and, in particular, the relative stability of such conditions. Such hatching times, as might be supposed, are carefully monitored by rencers. Once outside the delta the sting flies, which spend most of their adult lives as solitary insects, tend to disperse. Of the millions of sting flies hatched in the delta each summer, usually over a period of four or five days, a few return each fall, to begin the cycle again.

“Ai!” cried another fellow, stung.

Then I heard others cry out in pain, and begin to strike about them.

“The clouds come closer!” cried a fellow.

There could now be no mistaking the steadily increasing volume of sound approaching from the west. It seemed to fill the delta. It is produced by the movement of wings, the intense, almost unimaginably rapid beating of millions upon millions of small wings.

“Needle flies are about!” cried a man. “Beware!”

“The clouds approach more closely!” cried a man.

“But what are the clouds?” cried a fellow.

“They are needle flies!” cried a man.

I heard shrieks of pain. I pulled my head back, even in the hood. I felt a small body strike against my face, even through the leather of the hood.

I recoiled, suddenly, uttering a small noise of pain, it stifled by the gag. I had been stung on the shoulder. I lowered my body, so that only my head, hooded, was raised above the water. I heard men leaping into the water. The buzzing was now deafening. “My eyes!” screamed a man.

“My eyes!”

The flies tend to be attracted to the eyes, as to moist, bright objects.

I felt the raft pitch in the water as men left it.

The sting of the sting fly is painful, extremely so, but it is usually not, unless inflicted in great numbers, dangerous. Several stings, however, and even a few, depending on the individual, can induce nausea. Men have died from the stings of the flies but usually in such cases they have been inflicted in great numbers. A common reaction to the venom of the fly incidentally is a painful swelling in the area of the sting. A few such stings about the face can render a person unrecognizable. The swelling subsides, usually, in a few Ahn.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Vagabonds of Gor (Gorean Saga 24) (Kindle Locations 3229-3252). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


Too, it should prove useful when the chills set in, a predictable consequence of the venom of sting flies, when administered in more than nominal amounts. In an Ahn, under the blanket, sweating, I felt sick. It was only then, I think, that I began to realize the extent to which I must have been stung by the flies. To be sure, of the dozens, perhaps hundreds, which had alighted on my body, probably no more than twenty or thirty had actually stung me. The swelling from such stings usually appears almost immediately, and peaks within an Ahn, and then subsides in anywhere from a few Ahn to two or three days. I was in great pain, and felt nauseous, but, in spite of these things, I was in an excellent humor.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Vagabonds of Gor (Gorean Saga 24) (Kindle Locations 3509-3513). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


OST


Ost venom is fatal. Death occurs within a few ihn. Death by ost venom is among the most hideous of deaths, with the flesh turning orange like colored paper and peeling. The venom can be administered in powder form or, as is one case, from Turia, it can be deposited in a hollow tooth and administered in a deadly bite.

One such serpent was the huge, many-banded Gorean python, the hith. One to be feared even more perhaps was the tiny ost, a venomous, brilliantly orange reptile little more than a foot in length, whose bite spelled an excruciating death within seconds.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Outlaw of Gor (Gorean Saga 2) (Kindle Locations 316-318). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


As I tore the thing from my leg, glad that the sting had not been that of the venomous ost, the three hurtling moons of Gor broke from the dark cover of the clouds. I held the quivering plant up.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Outlaw of Gor (Gorean Saga 2) (Kindle Locations 414-415). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


“Ost,” read the guardsman. It was also the name of a species of tiny, brightly orange reptile, the most venomous on Gor.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Outlaw of Gor (Gorean Saga 2) (Kindle Locations 1108-1109). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


Like most members of my Caste, more than the monstrous tarns, those carnivorous hawklike giants of Gor, I dreaded such creatures as the tiny ost, that diminutive, venomous reptile, orange, scarcely more than a few inches in length, that might lurk at one’s very sandal and then, without provocation or warning, strike, its tiny fangs the prelude to excruciating torment, concluding only with sure death. Among warriors, the bite of an ost is thought to be one of the most cruel of all gates to the Cities of Dust; far preferable to them are the rending beak, the terrible talons of a tarn.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Outlaw of Gor (Gorean Saga 2) (Kindle Locations 1623-1627). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


The banded ost is a variety of ost, a small, customarily brilliantly orange Gorean reptile. It is exceedingly poisonous. The banded ost is yellowish orange and is marked with black rings.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Assassin of Gor (Gorean Saga 5) (Kindle Locations 5147-5148). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


“In time,” said the small man, “you will receive a packet of poison.”

I nodded, numbly. Rask of Treve must not die! He must not die! “You will be placed in the house of Bosk, a merchant of Port Kar,” he said.

“You will be placed in the kitchen of that house, and you will be used to serve his table.”

“I can’t,” I wept. “I cannot kill!”

“Then Rask of Treve dies,” said the small man. Haakon of Skjern laughed.

The small man held up a tiny packet. “This,” he said, “is the poison, a powder prepared from the venom of the ost.”

I shuddered. Death by ost venom is among the most hideous of deaths.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Captive of Gor (Gorean Saga 7) (Kindle Locations 6891-6897). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


Three more, since that time, as was determined from reports arriving at the quarters of the pit master, now the headquarters of the strangers, had perished. One had been pierced by a concealed spear, spring-released from the side of a corridor, another in crossing one of the narrow bridges over a crevice, it buckling as weight was placed at its center, another when an apparently solid portion of the corridor had fallen away beneath him, plunging him screaming, we heard the screams even where we were, into a nest of tiny, active serpents below, serpents called osts. They are, it seems, highly poisonous. The effects of the poison, too, I am told, are not pretty to watch.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Witness of Gor (Gorean Saga 26) (Kindle Locations 11939-11943). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


The ost, according to the resources, is a tiny, highly venomous snake.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Kur of Gor (Gorean Saga 28) (Kindle Locations 8999-9000). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


This is not as surprising as it might seem, as the poison of the ost, as that of many poisonous snakes, is prey-selective, deadly against warm-blooded animals, such as tiny urts, its customary prey, or even larger animals, such as verr and tabuk, but harmless to other snakes, to certain forms of tharlarion, and such.

[Norman, John (2011-10-05). Mariners of Gor (Kindle Locations 1745-1747). E-Reads. Kindle Edition.]

Who will deny to the tiny ost the shield and threat of its venom, who convince the tarsk boar to put aside his short, curved tusks?

[Norman, John (2011-10-05). Mariners of Gor (Kindle Location 6664). E-Reads. Kindle Edition.]


MARSH MOCCASIN


We saw a narrow, dark shape, about five feet long, like a slowly undulating whip, glide past. A small triangular head was almost level with the water surface. I did not think there had been much danger, but there was some possibility that the movement of her legs in the water might have attracted its attention.

“That is a marsh moccasin,” I said.

“Are they poisonous,” she asked.

“Yes,” I said.

“I never saw one before,” she said.

“They are not common,” I said, “even in the delta.”

“Are they poisonous like the ost?” she asked. I thought of a small fellow I had once known in Tharna. He had been called “Ost.”

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Vagabonds of Gor (Gorean Saga 24) (Kindle Locations 5501-5507). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]

“They are quite poisonous,” I said, “but their venom, as I understand it, does not compare to that of the ost.”

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Vagabonds of Gor (Gorean Saga 24) (Kindle Locations 5532-5533). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


POISONOUS INSECTS (UNSPECIFIED)


I shuddered. I was helpless at the bottom of the shaft. Were he to come upon me here how could I escape? Perhaps he would lower the rope and bucket for the others, and not me? Perhaps he would throw great stones down upon me? Perhaps he would lower poisonous insects or snakes into the pit? Perhaps he would leave me here to starve?

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Dancer of Gor (Gorean Saga 22) (Kindle Locations 7954-7956). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


RENNEL

I was told by Kamchak that once an army of a thousand wagons turned aside because a swarm of rennels, poisonous, crablike desert insects, did not defend its broken nest, crushed by the wheel of the lead wagon.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Nomads of Gor (Gorean Saga 4) (Kindle Locations 482-483). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


STING FLY - See Needle Fly


TROPICAL FISH


Many fish in these tropical waters are poisonous to eat, a function of certain forms of seaweed on which they feed. The seaweed is harmless to the fish but it contains substances toxic to humans.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Explorers of Gor (Gorean Saga 13) (Kindle Locations 2123-2124). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]


USHINDI OST


I looked to the round, shallow, circular pit in the center of the room. It was about a foot deep. The poles supporting the sleeping platform were set within it. In the pit, his hands still clutching, fingernails bloody, at one of the round poles supporting the platform, lay an askari. His body was twisted horribly, and contorted. The flesh had turned a blackish orange and, in places, had broken open, the skin peeling back like burned paper. A knife, fallen, lay near him in the pit. About his body, small, nervous, sinuous, crawled tiny snakes, osts. Each of these, startlingly, had tied to it a thin string. There were eight such diminutive reptiles. The strings, fastened, behind their heads, led up to a pole at the head of the sleeping platform, where they were tied. A woven basket hung, too, near the foot of the sleeping platform. The ost is usually an orange snake, but these were Ushindi osts, which are red with black stripes. Anatomically, and with respect to toxin, I am told they are almost identical to the common ost.

[Norman, John (2010-07-01). Explorers of Gor (Gorean Saga 13) (Kindle Locations 4961-4968). E-Reads, Ltd.. Kindle Edition.]